The Owl Eyes Blog

Updates! Annotated Shakespeare and CATE

Well, 2017 is off to a running start—we can barely believe we're already well into February! Owl Eyes continues to grow and develop thanks to feedback from our dedicated users and the hard work of our writing team. Here are some quick updates on what we've been doing on the website...

5 Things to Avoid While Teaching Shakespeare

Getting students to care about Shakespeare can be daunting and even intimidating. Though we often have the best intentions, many of us fall into the following teaching traps when we turn to the Bard. Let's look at these five (extremely common) things to avoid doing while teaching Shakespeare to high school students as well as how I've tried doing things instead...

Not a 1:1 Classroom? Four Ways to Still Use Owl Eyes

Working with technology in the classroom has many benefits, but it can be problematic depending on factors outside of our control. We’ve all had those days where the computer decides to indefinitely snooze or the Internet prefers to inscrutably do its own thing. Or maybe we’ve worked in schools or locations where we have limited (or no!) access to such technology. Whatever the reasons may be, let's examine a few ways Owl Eyes can be useful outside of the classroom...

Teacher Resources: An Annotation Lesson Plan

As Owl Eyes continues to grow and develop, I want to make sure we keep teacher support at the forefront of our efforts. One of the new things we’ve been working on with one of our excellent academic contributors is a set of lesson plans that specifically cater to classrooms on Owl Eyes. I am very much looking forward to releasing these for your use, and in the meantime, I thought this post would be a good place to share one of my own lesson plans for introducing students to annotating texts.

Carousel Reading: Reading as a Collaborative Experience

What I like about this activity is that students can interact with text that other students have produced. I’ve found that students can sometimes focus on their relationships to class readings as singular and dissonant; that is, they don’t see the process as directly relating to their community or to themselves. “Carousel Reading” helps the interaction take place on a level where the stakes matter because...

Owl Eyes at the NCTE Convention

We had a ton of fun and connected with some truly passionate teachers. We can't thank you enough for a perfect event, and the amazing feedback we received on our classroom annotation and assignment tools...

What is Owl Eyes?

Owl Eyes is an improved reading experience for students, teachers, and everyday readers. With Owl Eyes, you can read your favorite classics, or find a new favorite, in our literature library...