Chapter III. IN WHICH A CONVERSATION TAKES PLACE WHICH SEEMS LIKELY TO COST PHILEAS FOGG DEAR

Phileas Fogg, having shut the door of his house at half-past eleven, and having put his right foot before his left five hundred and seventy-five times, and his left foot before his right five hundred and seventy-six times, reached the Reform Club, an imposing edifice in Pall Mall, which could not have cost less than three millions. He repaired at once to the dining-room, the nine windows of which open upon a tasteful garden, where the trees were already gilded with an autumn colouring; and took his place at the habitual table, the cover of which had already been laid for him. His breakfast consisted of a side-dish, a broiled fish with Reading sauce, a scarlet slice of roast beef garnished with mushrooms, a rhubarb and gooseberry tart, and a morsel of Cheshire cheese, the whole being washed down with several cups of tea, for which the Reform is famous. He rose at thirteen minutes to one, and directed his steps towards the large hall, a sumptuous apartment adorned with lavishly-framed paintings. A flunkey handed him an uncut Times, which he proceeded to cut with a skill which betrayed familiarity with this delicate operation. The perusal of this paper absorbed Phileas Fogg until a quarter before four, whilst the Standard, his next task, occupied him till the dinner hour. Dinner passed as breakfast had done, and Mr. Fogg re-appeared in the reading-room and sat down to the Pall Mall at twenty minutes before six. Half an hour later several members of the Reform came in and drew up to the fireplace, where a coal fire was steadily burning. They were Mr. Fogg's usual partners at whist: Andrew Stuart, an engineer; John Sullivan and Samuel Fallentin, bankers; Thomas Flanagan, a brewer; and Gauthier Ralph, one of the Directors of the Bank of England—all rich and highly respectable personages, even in a club which comprises the princes of English trade and finance.

"Well, Ralph," said Thomas Flanagan, "what about that robbery?"

"Oh," replied Stuart, "the Bank will lose the money."

"On the contrary," broke in Ralph, "I hope we may put our hands on the robber. Skilful detectives have been sent to all the principal ports of America and the Continent, and he'll be a clever fellow if he slips through their fingers."

"But have you got the robber's description?" asked Stuart.

"In the first place, he is no robber at all," returned Ralph, positively.

"What! a fellow who makes off with fifty-five thousand pounds, no robber?"

"No."

"Perhaps he's a manufacturer, then."

"The Daily Telegraph says that he is a gentleman."

It was Phileas Fogg, whose head now emerged from behind his newspapers, who made this remark. He bowed to his friends, and entered into the conversation. The affair which formed its subject, and which was town talk, had occurred three days before at the Bank of England. A package of banknotes, to the value of fifty-five thousand pounds, had been taken from the principal cashier's table, that functionary being at the moment engaged in registering the receipt of three shillings and sixpence. Of course, he could not have his eyes everywhere. Let it be observed that the Bank of England reposes a touching confidence in the honesty of the public. There are neither guards nor gratings to protect its treasures; gold, silver, banknotes are freely exposed, at the mercy of the first comer. A keen observer of English customs relates that, being in one of the rooms of the Bank one day, he had the curiosity to examine a gold ingot weighing some seven or eight pounds. He took it up, scrutinised it, passed it to his neighbour, he to the next man, and so on until the ingot, going from hand to hand, was transferred to the end of a dark entry; nor did it return to its place for half an hour. Meanwhile, the cashier had not so much as raised his head. But in the present instance things had not gone so smoothly. The package of notes not being found when five o'clock sounded from the ponderous clock in the "drawing office," the amount was passed to the account of profit and loss. As soon as the robbery was discovered, picked detectives hastened off to Liverpool, Glasgow, Havre, Suez, Brindisi, New York, and other ports, inspired by the proffered reward of two thousand pounds, and five per cent. on the sum that might be recovered. Detectives were also charged with narrowly watching those who arrived at or left London by rail, and a judicial examination was at once entered upon.

There were real grounds for supposing, as the Daily Telegraph said, that the thief did not belong to a professional band. On the day of the robbery a well-dressed gentleman of polished manners, and with a well-to-do air, had been observed going to and fro in the paying room where the crime was committed. A description of him was easily procured and sent to the detectives; and some hopeful spirits, of whom Ralph was one, did not despair of his apprehension. The papers and clubs were full of the affair, and everywhere people were discussing the probabilities of a successful pursuit; and the Reform Club was especially agitated, several of its members being Bank officials.

Ralph would not concede that the work of the detectives was likely to be in vain, for he thought that the prize offered would greatly stimulate their zeal and activity. But Stuart was far from sharing this confidence; and, as they placed themselves at the whist-table, they continued to argue the matter. Stuart and Flanagan played together, while Phileas Fogg had Fallentin for his partner. As the game proceeded the conversation ceased, excepting between the rubbers, when it revived again.

"I maintain," said Stuart, "that the chances are in favour of the thief, who must be a shrewd fellow."

"Well, but where can he fly to?" asked Ralph. "No country is safe for him."

"Pshaw!"

"Where could he go, then?"

"Oh, I don't know that. The world is big enough."

"It was once," said Phileas Fogg, in a low tone. "Cut, sir," he added, handing the cards to Thomas Flanagan.

The discussion fell during the rubber, after which Stuart took up its thread.

"What do you mean by `once'? Has the world grown smaller?"

"Certainly," returned Ralph. "I agree with Mr. Fogg. The world has grown smaller, since a man can now go round it ten times more quickly than a hundred years ago. And that is why the search for this thief will be more likely to succeed."

"And also why the thief can get away more easily."

"Be so good as to play, Mr. Stuart," said Phileas Fogg.

But the incredulous Stuart was not convinced, and when the hand was finished, said eagerly: "You have a strange way, Ralph, of proving that the world has grown smaller. So, because you can go round it in three months—"

"In eighty days," interrupted Phileas Fogg.

"That is true, gentlemen," added John Sullivan. "Only eighty days, now that the section between Rothal and Allahabad, on the Great Indian Peninsula Railway, has been opened. Here is the estimate made by the Daily Telegraph:

"Yes, in eighty days!" exclaimed Stuart, who in his excitement made a false deal. "But that doesn't take into account bad weather, contrary winds, shipwrecks, railway accidents, and so on."

"All included," returned Phileas Fogg, continuing to play despite the discussion.

"But suppose the Hindoos or Indians pull up the rails," replied Stuart; "suppose they stop the trains, pillage the luggage-vans, and scalp the passengers!"

"All included," calmly retorted Fogg; adding, as he threw down the cards, "Two trumps."

Stuart, whose turn it was to deal, gathered them up, and went on: "You are right, theoretically, Mr. Fogg, but practically—"

"Practically also, Mr. Stuart."

"I'd like to see you do it in eighty days."

"It depends on you. Shall we go?"

"Heaven preserve me! But I would wager four thousand pounds that such a journey, made under these conditions, is impossible."

"Quite possible, on the contrary," returned Mr. Fogg.

"Well, make it, then!"

"The journey round the world in eighty days?"

"Yes."

"I should like nothing better."

"When?"

"At once. Only I warn you that I shall do it at your expense."

"It's absurd!" cried Stuart, who was beginning to be annoyed at the persistency of his friend. "Come, let's go on with the game."

"Deal over again, then," said Phileas Fogg. "There's a false deal."

Stuart took up the pack with a feverish hand; then suddenly put them down again.

"Well, Mr. Fogg," said he, "it shall be so: I will wager the four thousand on it."

"Calm yourself, my dear Stuart," said Fallentin. "It's only a joke."

"When I say I'll wager," returned Stuart, "I mean it."

"All right," said Mr. Fogg; and, turning to the others, he continued: "I have a deposit of twenty thousand at Baring's which I will willingly risk upon it."

"Twenty thousand pounds!" cried Sullivan. "Twenty thousand pounds, which you would lose by a single accidental delay!"

"The unforeseen does not exist," quietly replied Phileas Fogg.

"But, Mr. Fogg, eighty days are only the estimate of the least possible time in which the journey can be made."

"A well-used minimum suffices for everything."

"But, in order not to exceed it, you must jump mathematically from the trains upon the steamers, and from the steamers upon the trains again."

"I will jump—mathematically."

"You are joking."

"A true Englishman doesn't joke when he is talking about so serious a thing as a wager," replied Phileas Fogg, solemnly. "I will bet twenty thousand pounds against anyone who wishes that I will make the tour of the world in eighty days or less; in nineteen hundred and twenty hours, or a hundred and fifteen thousand two hundred minutes. Do you accept?"

"We accept," replied Messrs. Stuart, Fallentin, Sullivan, Flanagan, and Ralph, after consulting each other.

"Good," said Mr. Fogg. "The train leaves for Dover at a quarter before nine. I will take it."

"This very evening?" asked Stuart.

"This very evening," returned Phileas Fogg. He took out and consulted a pocket almanac, and added, "As today is Wednesday, the 2nd of October, I shall be due in London in this very room of the Reform Club, on Saturday, the 21st of December, at a quarter before nine p.m.; or else the twenty thousand pounds, now deposited in my name at Baring's, will belong to you, in fact and in right, gentlemen. Here is a cheque for the amount."

A memorandum of the wager was at once drawn up and signed by the six parties, during which Phileas Fogg preserved a stoical composure. He certainly did not bet to win, and had only staked the twenty thousand pounds, half of his fortune, because he foresaw that he might have to expend the other half to carry out this difficult, not to say unattainable, project. As for his antagonists, they seemed much agitated; not so much by the value of their stake, as because they had some scruples about betting under conditions so difficult to their friend.

The clock struck seven, and the party offered to suspend the game so that Mr. Fogg might make his preparations for departure.

"I am quite ready now," was his tranquil response. "Diamonds are trumps: be so good as to play, gentlemen."

     From London to Suez via Mont Cenis and
       Brindisi, by rail and steamboats .................  7 days
     From Suez to Bombay, by steamer .................... 13  "
     From Bombay to Calcutta, by rail ...................  3  "
     From Calcutta to Hong Kong, by steamer ............. 13  "
     From Hong Kong to Yokohama (Japan), by steamer .....  6  "
     From Yokohama to San Francisco, by steamer ......... 22  "
     From San Francisco to New York, by rail ............. 7  "
     From New York to London, by steamer and rail ........ 9  "
                                                          -------
       Total ............................................ 80 days."

Footnotes

  1. figure of speech: to begin again where previous thought or conversation left off: to start thinking or talking about the same topic from the place where the thought or conversation previously stopped (or take up where it left off)

    — Karen P.L. Hardison
  2. in games like whist and bridge: a series of three games that make a match

    — Karen P.L. Hardison
  3. figure of speech: the conversation stopped as the men became silent while they concentrated on their rubber (round) off whist

    — Karen P.L. Hardison
  4. A request to lift the top portion of the playing cards and slide that part under the bottom part in preparation for the shuffle and deal in a card game, specifically, whist.

    — Karen P.L. Hardison
  5. exclamation, out-dated (old fashioned): an expression indicating a sudden feeling of disbelief, scorn, contempt or impatience

    — Karen P.L. Hardison
  6. verb: restored to interest; restored to participation in; renewed activity with or in

    — Karen P.L. Hardison
  7. This is the timetable that Fogg will be working from and traveling in accord with as he jumps mathematically from steamer to train and from train to steamer.

    — Karen P.L. Hardison
  8. Fogg realizes that to succeed in getting round the world in 80 days, he might have to spend as much money as he has wagered: 20,000 British Pounds.

    — Karen P.L. Hardison
  9. This is an interesting statement about Fogg. It implies that he doesn't bet with the intent of depriving his friends of their money. In other words, the purpose of the bet was not to acquire more money. It also suggests that, despite his dramatic protestations against the hazard of unforeseen obstacles, Fogg knows the wager cannot be won, in other words, the trip cannot successfully be made.

    This adds a puzzle to Fogg's characterization and it adds suspense to the unfolding plot.

    — Karen P.L. Hardison
  10. 80 days reduced to first hours, then minutes so as that there could be no misunderstanding his meaning and so as to emphasize the precision of Fogg's understanding, wager and intention.

    — Karen P.L. Hardison
  11. The English upper classes were stereotypically noted for enjoying a good bet from time to time (or more often than that).

    — Karen P.L. Hardison
  12. verb, figure of speech: to move quickly and suddenly as though jumping into or through the air

    — Karen P.L. Hardison
  13. This means that as soon as the trains arrive at their destinations, Fogg must immediately board a steam ship to succeed in the trip round the world. In other words, there would be no room for delay or accidents.

    The next passage means the same thing but continues the description from disembarking the steam ships to immediately embark the next train.

    — Karen P.L. Hardison
  14. Fallentine does not believe the trip can be made in 80 days thus does not believe that Fogg would seriously--only jokingly--accept a wager to do so.

    — Karen P.L. Hardison
  15. Surprised at first that Fogg should agree to the challenge, Stuart now accepts the wager that Fogg go round the world in 80 days.

    — Karen P.L. Hardison
  16. The challenge made by Stuart that Fogg undertake to travel round the world in 80 days as he says can do.

    The entrance of the conflict of the plot.

    — Karen P.L. Hardison
  17. verb (phrasal verb): opposite to what has been said, in opposition to what is said or expected

    Stuart says that no trip round the word can be made in 80 days. Fogg opposes his assertion with the contradicting statement that it can.

    — Karen P.L. Hardison
  18. A Protestant variation on an age-old Catholic expression taken from the Catholic prayer, "May the saints preserve us." The Protestant meaning is to ask a blessing of protection from Heaven, a metonymy for God: [paraphrase] My God protect me from danger and harm.

    — Karen P.L. Hardison
  19. Trump cards in whist have more value and are more important. Having two trumps, or two trump cards, means points are won in whist.

    Fogg dramatically emphasizes his statements about traveling round the world in 80 days first by the gesture of throwing down (figurative meaning put down with some force) his cards and second by claiming two trump card points.

    — Karen P.L. Hardison
  20. "threw down" figure of speech: Fogg's "retort" was emphasized with a strong gesture of putting the cards down with force rather than simply laying them down.

    — Karen P.L. Hardison
  21. verb: a reply that is tinted with wit or subdued anger or, as in this case, superiority

    — Karen P.L. Hardison
  22. He made an error while dealing the cards for the rubber of whist.

    — Karen P.L. Hardison
  23. verb: to instructive authoritatively; to lay an official commission upon a person's behavior; to set an authoritative course of action for someone else

    — Karen P.L. Hardison
  24. verb: to come into view; to come forth; to come to be seen

    — Karen P.L. Hardison
  25. There are 12 shillings in one British pound, so 3 shillings is 1/4 a pound.

    There are 12 pence (pennies) in 1 shilling, so sixpence is half a shilling.

    The "principal cashier" (U.S. teller) was engrossed in registering the deposit of 3 1/2 shillings, or a little more than 1/4 of a pound. In U.S. currency, you might compare this to a little more than a 1/4 of a dollar (25 cents plus some).

    The narrator is being satirical and ironic by pointing out and ridiculing the inconsistency of the cashier giving engrossed attention to an insignificant amount while a vastly large sum goes missing!

    — Karen P.L. Hardison
  26. The "treasure" in the keeping of the "principal cashier" was added up and entered into the accounting books recording bank profits and losses. It is through the accounting system that the robbery was discovered because the bank was then shown to have taken a substantial loss in funds.

    The narrator is again being satirical and ironic and ridiculing the weaknesses of the British banking system: they could not see that they were robbed because of "touching confidence" and attention to "three shillings and six pence"; they only knew they were robbed when the accounting books of profits and losses showed a loss.

    — Karen P.L. Hardison
  27. Archaic, no longer used of banks: most probably either the room where cashiers draw out funds from customer accounts to give to customers or the office from where funds are regulated and drawn from the vault to distribute to cashiers (U.S.: tellers).

    — Karen P.L. Hardison
  28. adjective: quick to notice and understand; intellectually able to penetrate observed situations; sharply observant

    — Karen P.L. Hardison
  29. figure of speech: meaning entirely in the power of whoever might come

    What the narrator is communicating is that since the "treasure" of the bank is not protected in any way, whoever chose to could easily rob it of whatever treasure suited them best: gold, silver, or banknotes (currency).

    — Karen P.L. Hardison
  30. The narrator is being satirical and ironic here as he ridicules the "touching confidence" that the Bank of England places in the public, believing that there will be no robberies, even if tellers/cashiers are careless and inattentive. The narrator's point is well made seeing as how the Bank was robbed.

    — Karen P.L. Hardison
  31. adjective: triggering feelings of tender sympathy, e.g., a touching moment: a moment that causes you to feel tenderly sympathetic

    — Karen P.L. Hardison
  32. verb: to place something, usually confidence or trust, in someone or something

    — Karen P.L. Hardison
  33. adverb (sometimes verb): to move continually backward and forward, back and forth, back and forth

    — Karen P.L. Hardison
  34. Selected detectives with Scotland Yard; not every detective on the Force.

    — Karen P.L. Hardison
  35. noun: the card deck suit that has been denominated as having more point value than the others and with which point winning "tricks," or plays, can be most profitably made

    — Karen P.L. Hardison
  36. verb: temporarily withdraw from active pursuit; temporarily prevent or interrupt the continuance of an action or activity

    — Karen P.L. Hardison
  37. noun: moral hesitation or moral doubt related to specific actions of courses of action, i.e., Fogg's friends felt it slightly lacking in moral integrity to set their friend upon so impossible a task

    — Karen P.L. Hardison
  38. adjective: void of expressing feelings or emotions, i.e., Fogg was stoical, expressionless and emotionless about obligating twenty thousand pounds

    — Karen P.L. Hardison
  39. noun: a notation or record of an event or transaction held for future reference, i.e., a note was made of the conditions of the round the world in eighty days wager to hold Fogg accountable for his twenty thousand British pounds

    — Karen P.L. Hardison
  40. noun: UK spelling for USA "check"; drawn upon a deposit account held by a bank or savings institute

    — Karen P.L. Hardison
  41. Baring's Bank for merchants, London [see Ch, 1 "recommended by the Barings"]

    — Karen P.L. Hardison
  42. noun: an annual calendar with supplemental material like tides and astronomical data

    — Karen P.L. Hardison
  43. This phrase means that a minimum estimation of the time required will be adequate for all travel, accidents and surprises if the time is used well and with care: a well-used minimum of time suffices to all needs.

    — Karen P.L. Hardison
  44. verb: to be deprived of, as in to lose money in a bet,* i.e., Fogg runs the risk of losing his money in the bet.*

    — Karen P.L. Hardison
  45. adjective, figure of speech: with the exactness and precision such as is required in mathematics

    — Karen P.L. Hardison
  46. noun (also verb as in to estimate): an approximation of time, value, duration, quantity or extent; a best-guest calculation or judgement

    — Karen P.L. Hardison
  47. adjective: that which is neither planned on nor anticipated

    Fogg is saying the opposite, that there will be nothing that is not planned for nor unanticipated; there will be no surprises, all may be anticipated and planned for.

    — Karen P.L. Hardison
  48. noun phrase: indicating that cards were dealt out of accord with the rules of the game (in a friendly game among friends, no implication of cheating is intended)

    The implication Fogg suggests is that the dealer was distracted by the heated and exasperating conversation.

    — Karen P.L. Hardison
  49. verb (also noun as in "place your wager"); verb, "I would wager": to place a bet; to initiate gambling for monetary stakes

    — Karen P.L. Hardison
  50. adjective: according to assumed facts; not proven; not practical knowledge; speculative

    — Karen P.L. Hardison
  51. India's first railway that was built during British colonization therefore incorporated by an act of the British Parliament, occurring on August 1, 1849, while being built and operated by the East India Company beginning only days later on August 17, 1849.

    — Karen P.L. Hardison
  52. City in India at the joining of the Ganges and the Jumna Rivers.

    — Karen P.L. Hardison
  53. The title response to the thematic challenge: Phileas Fogg will be called upon to prove his words.

    — Karen P.L. Hardison
  54. The thematic challenge to how long it takes to go round the world.

    — Karen P.L. Hardison
  55. adjective: when someone will not or cannot believe something, e.g., Stuart was unwilling to believe the world could be said to be smaller than it had been (he is missing the metaphor ...)

    — Karen P.L. Hardison
  56. adjective (*in context of the robber): *malicious but sharp powers of judgement; astute though mischievous [ordinarily: sharp powers of judgement; astute]

    — Karen P.L. Hardison
  57. noun: a "unity of play" comprising a unit in a card game in which to have a winner and losers; in whist, the unit of play that is a rubber is three games

    — Karen P.L. Hardison
  58. noun: great enthusiasm or energy (too much zeal produces an unfavorable "zealot")

    — Karen P.L. Hardison
  59. vain, adjective
    to be without success, without fruit; useless

    Something that is said "to be in vain" is thought to be useless and thought to be ultimately without success.

    — Karen P.L. Hardison
  60. verb: to admit a change of mind; to admit being bested after having defended an earlier idea or position, e.g., The candidate will not concede the lost election until the last vote is counted.

    — Karen P.L. Hardison
  61. adjective: feeling or seeming to others to be feeling nervous or actively troubled

    — Karen P.L. Hardison
  62. noun: the activity of following after someone with the intention of overtaking or apprehending

    — Karen P.L. Hardison
  63. noun: anxiety or fear of something unpleasant about to befall; the opposite of hopefulness

    — Karen P.L. Hardison
  64. idiom, noun phrase: individuals who maintain hope in their task

    Ralph was one of the individuals who maintained hope in a successful resolution to the task of finding the thief.

    — Karen P.L. Hardison
  65. verb (to procure): carefully attained

    The description, though carefully taken, was easily attained (easily attained though carefully undertaken).

    — Karen P.L. Hardison
  66. noun: the central room in a bank where funds are paid out at the depositor's request: the tellers' room

    — Karen P.L. Hardison
  67. adverb (sometimes gerund verb): to move continually backward and forward, back and forth, back and forth

    — Karen P.L. Hardison
  68. adjective: as though by or of a court or judge (or actually by a court or judge)

    The detectives examined those who came or left by London rail in a judicial manner, not in a suspicious, intrusive manner.

    — Karen P.L. Hardison
  69. noun: an oblong block of solid gold (as seen movies during cinematic bank robberies)

    — Karen P.L. Hardison
  70. Irony, literary device: ironic description of what he was doing when "fifty-five thousand pounds" had been taken from atop his desk: he was counting three shillings and sixpence!

    — Karen P.L. Hardison
  71. noun, one who performs specified official duties or functions.

    The principal cashier at the Bank of England is the functionary referred to.

    — Karen P.L. Hardison
  72. The main or head bank cashier. Americans say "bank teller" instead of "bank cashier."

    — Karen P.L. Hardison
  73. A third London newspaper that is also still in existence today.

    — Karen P.L. Hardison
  74. The Reform Club backed political reform, particularly the Great Reform of 1836, and further political reform would threaten to redistribute wealth away bankers and finance.

    — Karen P.L. Hardison
  75. Not real names of person's yet representative of real person's in those employment positions.

    — Karen P.L. Hardison
  76. This is a Victorian era game to play, but there seems to be confusion today as to what it is exactly. One description says it is played with a mallet and balls, like croquet, definitely an outdoors game, while another suggests it is a game played with cards.

    Since Fogg is inside the sumptuous and lavish Reform Club, it is not likely that he "sat down" to watch or to play a mallet (large wooden hammering tool) and ball version of the game. His location strongly suggests a card game version of "the Pall Mall."

    — Karen P.L. Hardison
  77. The London Evening Standard newspaper, still in existence today.

    This contrasts the Times of London, which is a morning newspaper reporting events of the evening and night, with the London Evening Standard, which is an evening paper reporting events of the day.

    — Karen P.L. Hardison
  78. conjunction, same as "while": indicating during a time or indicating contrasting things, e.g., contrasting Fogg's reading of the Times to his reading of the Standard

    — Karen P.L. Hardison
  79. verb: to read or examine something in a thorough and careful way

    — Karen P.L. Hardison
  80. Before an uncut quatro-folded newspaper's collection of printed, folded quatro sheets can be read, it is necessary to cut open the top fold. Men might wear little scissors on their watch chains for the express purpose of cutting their newspapers open across the top. [See "uncut Times"]

    — Karen P.L. Hardison
  81. Reference to The Times of London newspaper, still in operation today with an Internet online publication as well.

    A "uncut" newspaper, the sheets of which have double-sided printing, is one that cannot be read yet because it has been folded quatro style, with a fold down, then a fold from left to right, and is still in its original condition. Quatro folding leaves loose edges at the bottom and on the right but folds at left and at top. Newspapers are assembled by inserting several of these quatros into the interior of the first, meaning every set of two pages is joined by a top fold.

    — Karen P.L. Hardison
  82. A reference to ornate and gilded (gold covered) frames for paintings and portraits.

    lavish, adjective
    ornate, rich, luxurious

    — Karen P.L. Hardison
  83. In England, a liveried footman or other category of servant.

    livery,* noun*
    specialized uniforms with the design and colors of the family, of the "house," the servant is employed by and the equipment (e.g., coaches) is owned by; livery makes wealthy and important people recognizable by name upon sight of the livery

    — Karen P.L. Hardison
  84. A firm and crumbly cheese originating from Cheshire in the north of England, nearby Manchester.

    "a morsel of Cheshire cheese": a small bit of this firm, crumbly and sharp tasting Northern English cheese

    — Karen P.L. Hardison
  85. A sweet dessert made of cooked rhubarb stalks and gooseberries.

    tart, noun
    open-faced pie without a top, covering crust

    rhubarb, noun
    a vegetable similar to celery but red in color and eaten as a fruit after long cooking in much sugar

    gooseberry, noun
    yellow-green or reddish berry often used in cooking

    — Karen P.L. Hardison
  86. This reference to "scarlet" color indicates that Fogg likes his roast beef "rare," that is, with the minimum of cooking as opposed to "well done" with the maximum amount of cooking.

    — Karen P.L. Hardison
  87. verb: to decorate or to embellish something with something else, e.g., Fogg's beef was embellished and decorated with mushrooms.

    — Karen P.L. Hardison
  88. A savory sauce (not a sweet sauce for sweets) for fish developed in 1789 by James Cocks of Reading, England, that took advantage of new imports by combining traditional British walnut pickle (pickled walnut pieces) and sweet bay leaf with "Oriental" soy sauce and East Indies ginger, mustard, pepper and South American cayenne, with shallots and anchovies; slow-boiled, and strained into a sauce. 

    Since Fogg's story is set in 1872, Reading sauce is now an established English staple.

    — Karen P.L. Hardison
  89. Synecdoche, figure of speech: "Side-dish" is a type of food that is an extra and a complement to the entree, the main food, e.g., browned potatoes are a side-dish to over-easy eggs. [Now spelled "side dish" with no hyphen.]

    ** Synecdoche:** a figure of speech in which a part of something comes to refer to the whole thing, e.g., "side-dish," which is a dish placed on a table to the side of something, as a synecdoche means a type of a food that is not the main course, not the entree.

    figure of speech: a word, phrase or expression that has a non-literal meaning that is quite different from it's literal meaning: e.g., side-dish literally means a plate on the side; side-dish figuratively means a type of a food that complements the main entree.

    — Karen P.L. Hardison
  90. Idiomatic, figure of speech, past tense abbreviated form of the idiom "lay the table" as in "lay the table for him."

    The meaning of "laid for him" is that the "swan-skin" soled waiters of Chapter 1 have set out and arranged upon the linen covered table the articles itemized in Chapter 1: plates, silverware, glasses, decanters, and all the "viands" from the various pantries (storage rooms for foods, wines, utensils, plates). [See Ch. 1 "all the resources of the club ..."]

    — Karen P.L. Hardison
  91. Table cover, tablecloth: one of the finely woven linen tablecloths of Chapter 1 [see Ch. 1, "finest linen"].

    — Karen P.L. Hardison
  92. Regular: the table at which he regularly sat to breakfast or dine (eat breakfast or dinner).

    — Karen P.L. Hardison
  93. gilded, adjective
    covered over lightly as if with gold paint or gold leaf (thin sheets of pressed gold powder)

    **Implied metaphor, **literary device, comparing autumnal trees having burnished leaves to gilded works of art, mirrors, picture frames; to something collectible and of great value and beauty.

    — Karen P.L. Hardison
  94. verb, formal usage: to go to a place, e.g., We repaired to the restaurant after the theatre.

    — Karen P.L. Hardison
  95. Three millions British pounds currency. [Americans say "three million" making "million" an uncountable noun, which is different from the British use that makes "million/millions" a countable noun.]

    — Karen P.L. Hardison
  96. A district in London known as "Clubland" for its collection of men's clubs (now men's and women's clubs).

    — Karen P.L. Hardison
  97. Referring to Queensberry House [see Chapter 1, paragraph 1, "No. 7"] meaning that it is a grand and impressive, large and spacious house, which it is with its two identical jutting wings.

    imposing,* adjective*
    having an appearance that is grand and impressive

    edifice,* noun*
    a building, usually large, imposing

    — Karen P.L. Hardison
  98. Phileas Fogg not only counts his steps, he counts the steps of his right and left feet separately. This mean that Queensberry House's front door is in fact one thousand one hundred and fifty-one (1,151) steps from the Reform Club door.

    — Karen P.L. Hardison