Chapter XVII. SHOWING WHAT HAPPENED ON THE VOYAGE FROM SINGAPORE TO HONG KONG

The detective and Passepartout met often on deck after this interview, though Fix was reserved, and did not attempt to induce his companion to divulge any more facts concerning Mr. Fogg. He caught a glimpse of that mysterious gentleman once or twice; but Mr. Fogg usually confined himself to the cabin, where he kept Aouda company, or, according to his inveterate habit, took a hand at whist.

Passepartout began very seriously to conjecture what strange chance kept Fix still on the route that his master was pursuing. It was really worth considering why this certainly very amiable and complacent person, whom he had first met at Suez, had then encountered on board the Mongolia, who disembarked at Bombay, which he announced as his destination, and now turned up so unexpectedly on the Rangoon, was following Mr. Fogg's tracks step by step. What was Fix's object? Passepartout was ready to wager his Indian shoes—which he religiously preserved—that Fix would also leave Hong Kong at the same time with them, and probably on the same steamer.

Passepartout might have cudgelled his brain for a century without hitting upon the real object which the detective had in view. He never could have imagined that Phileas Fogg was being tracked as a robber around the globe. But, as it is in human nature to attempt the solution of every mystery, Passepartout suddenly discovered an explanation of Fix's movements, which was in truth far from unreasonable. Fix, he thought, could only be an agent of Mr. Fogg's friends at the Reform Club, sent to follow him up, and to ascertain that he really went round the world as had been agreed upon.

"It's clear!" repeated the worthy servant to himself, proud of his shrewdness. "He's a spy sent to keep us in view! That isn't quite the thing, either, to be spying Mr. Fogg, who is so honourable a man! Ah, gentlemen of the Reform, this shall cost you dear!"

Passepartout, enchanted with his discovery, resolved to say nothing to his master, lest he should be justly offended at this mistrust on the part of his adversaries. But he determined to chaff Fix, when he had the chance, with mysterious allusions, which, however, need not betray his real suspicions.

During the afternoon of Wednesday, 30th October, the Rangoon entered the Strait of Malacca, which separates the peninsula of that name from Sumatra. The mountainous and craggy islets intercepted the beauties of this noble island from the view of the travellers. The Rangoon weighed anchor at Singapore the next day at four a.m., to receive coal, having gained half a day on the prescribed time of her arrival. Phileas Fogg noted this gain in his journal, and then, accompanied by Aouda, who betrayed a desire for a walk on shore, disembarked.

Fix, who suspected Mr. Fogg's every movement, followed them cautiously, without being himself perceived; while Passepartout, laughing in his sleeve at Fix's manoeuvres, went about his usual errands.

The island of Singapore is not imposing in aspect, for there are no mountains; yet its appearance is not without attractions. It is a park checkered by pleasant highways and avenues. A handsome carriage, drawn by a sleek pair of New Holland horses, carried Phileas Fogg and Aouda into the midst of rows of palms with brilliant foliage, and of clove-trees, whereof the cloves form the heart of a half-open flower. Pepper plants replaced the prickly hedges of European fields; sago-bushes, large ferns with gorgeous branches, varied the aspect of this tropical clime; while nutmeg-trees in full foliage filled the air with a penetrating perfume. Agile and grinning bands of monkeys skipped about in the trees, nor were tigers wanting in the jungles.

After a drive of two hours through the country, Aouda and Mr. Fogg returned to the town, which is a vast collection of heavy-looking, irregular houses, surrounded by charming gardens rich in tropical fruits and plants; and at ten o'clock they re-embarked, closely followed by the detective, who had kept them constantly in sight.

Passepartout, who had been purchasing several dozen mangoes—a fruit as large as good-sized apples, of a dark-brown colour outside and a bright red within, and whose white pulp, melting in the mouth, affords gourmands a delicious sensation—was waiting for them on deck. He was only too glad to offer some mangoes to Aouda, who thanked him very gracefully for them.

At eleven o'clock the Rangoon rode out of Singapore harbour, and in a few hours the high mountains of Malacca, with their forests, inhabited by the most beautifully-furred tigers in the world, were lost to view. Singapore is distant some thirteen hundred miles from the island of Hong Kong, which is a little English colony near the Chinese coast. Phileas Fogg hoped to accomplish the journey in six days, so as to be in time for the steamer which would leave on the 6th of November for Yokohama, the principal Japanese port.

The Rangoon had a large quota of passengers, many of whom disembarked at Singapore, among them a number of Indians, Ceylonese, Chinamen, Malays, and Portuguese, mostly second-class travellers.

The weather, which had hitherto been fine, changed with the last quarter of the moon. The sea rolled heavily, and the wind at intervals rose almost to a storm, but happily blew from the south-west, and thus aided the steamer's progress. The captain as often as possible put up his sails, and under the double action of steam and sail the vessel made rapid progress along the coasts of Anam and Cochin China. Owing to the defective construction of the Rangoon, however, unusual precautions became necessary in unfavourable weather; but the loss of time which resulted from this cause, while it nearly drove Passepartout out of his senses, did not seem to affect his master in the least. Passepartout blamed the captain, the engineer, and the crew, and consigned all who were connected with the ship to the land where the pepper grows. Perhaps the thought of the gas, which was remorselessly burning at his expense in Saville Row, had something to do with his hot impatience.

"You are in a great hurry, then," said Fix to him one day, "to reach Hong Kong?"

"A very great hurry!"

"Mr. Fogg, I suppose, is anxious to catch the steamer for Yokohama?"

"Terribly anxious."

"You believe in this journey around the world, then?"

"Absolutely. Don't you, Mr. Fix?"

"I? I don't believe a word of it."

"You're a sly dog!" said Passepartout, winking at him.

This expression rather disturbed Fix, without his knowing why. Had the Frenchman guessed his real purpose? He knew not what to think. But how could Passepartout have discovered that he was a detective? Yet, in speaking as he did, the man evidently meant more than he expressed.

Passepartout went still further the next day; he could not hold his tongue.

"Mr. Fix," said he, in a bantering tone, "shall we be so unfortunate as to lose you when we get to Hong Kong?"

"Why," responded Fix, a little embarrassed, "I don't know; perhaps—"

"Ah, if you would only go on with us! An agent of the Peninsular Company, you know, can't stop on the way! You were only going to Bombay, and here you are in China. America is not far off, and from America to Europe is only a step."

Fix looked intently at his companion, whose countenance was as serene as possible, and laughed with him. But Passepartout persisted in chaffing him by asking him if he made much by his present occupation.

"Yes, and no," returned Fix; "there is good and bad luck in such things. But you must understand that I don't travel at my own expense."

"Oh, I am quite sure of that!" cried Passepartout, laughing heartily.

Fix, fairly puzzled, descended to his cabin and gave himself up to his reflections. He was evidently suspected; somehow or other the Frenchman had found out that he was a detective. But had he told his master? What part was he playing in all this: was he an accomplice or not? Was the game, then, up? Fix spent several hours turning these things over in his mind, sometimes thinking that all was lost, then persuading himself that Fogg was ignorant of his presence, and then undecided what course it was best to take.

Nevertheless, he preserved his coolness of mind, and at last resolved to deal plainly with Passepartout. If he did not find it practicable to arrest Fogg at Hong Kong, and if Fogg made preparations to leave that last foothold of English territory, he, Fix, would tell Passepartout all. Either the servant was the accomplice of his master, and in this case the master knew of his operations, and he should fail; or else the servant knew nothing about the robbery, and then his interest would be to abandon the robber.

Such was the situation between Fix and Passepartout. Meanwhile Phileas Fogg moved about above them in the most majestic and unconscious indifference. He was passing methodically in his orbit around the world, regardless of the lesser stars which gravitated around him. Yet there was near by what the astronomers would call a disturbing star, which might have produced an agitation in this gentleman's heart. But no! the charms of Aouda failed to act, to Passepartout's great surprise; and the disturbances, if they existed, would have been more difficult to calculate than those of Uranus which led to the discovery of Neptune.

It was every day an increasing wonder to Passepartout, who read in Aouda's eyes the depths of her gratitude to his master. Phileas Fogg, though brave and gallant, must be, he thought, quite heartless. As to the sentiment which this journey might have awakened in him, there was clearly no trace of such a thing; while poor Passepartout existed in perpetual reveries.

One day he was leaning on the railing of the engine-room, and was observing the engine, when a sudden pitch of the steamer threw the screw out of the water. The steam came hissing out of the valves; and this made Passepartout indignant.

"The valves are not sufficiently charged!" he exclaimed. "We are not going. Oh, these English! If this was an American craft, we should blow up, perhaps, but we should at all events go faster!"

Footnotes

  1. This is an interesting allusion to the 19th century analysis of the American people as being somewhat bold, adventurous, perhaps reckless and daring (as well as innovative and enterprising). Was this a correct analysis and, if so, is it true today?

    — Karen P.L. Hardison
  2. adjective: strongly displeased at something perceived as unjust, offensive, harmful

    Passepartout is indignant, as is explained in the next paragraph, by the loss of speed in the steamship since he is already in agony about the speed of travel due to the necessity of a prompt arrival time because the next phase of his journey with Fogg depends on a punctual arrival time.

    — Karen P.L. Hardison
  3. Water is feed into the engine to create steam. If the controlling water feed screw is jolted loose, as it may be with a sudden jarring, twisting, lurching movement ("pitch") of the steamship because of rough seas, then the hot steam that the water converts to would escape out the nearest opening, which in this case seems to have been the feed screw hole, now freed of its screw.

    — Karen P.L. Hardison
  4. In steam ships, it was possible for passengers to descend to a lower level to watch the workings of the relatively newly developed and innovated steam engine powered steamship (Richard Wright's "SS Experiment" first Atlantic Ocean passage, July 1813). A Hollywood version of this can be seen in the Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers movie, Shall We Dance (1937) in which Astaire's character does a song and dance below deck in the engine room.

    — Karen P.L. Hardison
  5. This allusion is a veiled confession that Passepartout is swayed emotionally by the inner and outer beauties of Aouda, who has not swayed any emotions except gallantry and protectiveness in Fogg.

    reverie, noun
    dreamy or fanciful musings about someone or something

    — Karen P.L. Hardison
  6. In the extended astronomical metaphor, Aouda is alluded to as "a disturbing star" because of the romantic feelings she might have aroused in Fogg, who gallantly spent such long spans of time with her.

    — Karen P.L. Hardison
  7. The narrator here launches an extended astronomical metaphor (astronomy: the science of the position, nature and movement of the stars and planets) in which Fogg is a great and "majestic" heavenly body "above" while Fix and Passepartout are "lesser" heavenly bodies that seem to be gravitationally pulled toward Fix.

    — Karen P.L. Hardison
  8. noun: someone who knowingly and willfully helps another commit a crime, e.g., robbing the Bank of England in London

    — Karen P.L. Hardison
  9. The English Empire stopped to eastward with China. After Hong Kong, China, Fogg's next stop was Yokohama, Japan.

    Therefore, "the last foothold of English territory" means the last territory on Fogg's journey that is part of the British Empire, Hong Kong,

    — Karen P.L. Hardison
  10. adjective: a plan capable of being done or put into action

    — Karen P.L. Hardison
  11. To tell the truth and to be direct and forthright.

    In other words, Fix has decided to tell Passepartout about who he really is and about what he is really doing there aboard the Rangoon.

    — Karen P.L. Hardison
  12. This idiom means to think about something or a set of related things and examine them from every angle and perspective to try to find understanding, revelation, enlightenment or epiphany.

    idiom, noun: a culturally used expression that is universally understood in that culture and that has a figurative meaning that is not literal; idioms begin as figurative metaphors that, once they become well known and over-used, become trite cliches that, once they become culturally universal, become idioms, which is a figure of speech that everyone in a given culture understands though the meaning is hidden in figurative language.

    — Karen P.L. Hardison
  13. This idiomatic cliched expression means: Is my deception and trickery discovered?

    — Karen P.L. Hardison
  14. Fix has decided that Passepartout has fathomed the secret that Fix is a police detective who is interested in Fogg (i.e., "his master") for some criminal reason. Fix thinks that, presumably, Passepartout is aware that Fogg has wealth that is unusual and that cannot be accounted for. Therefore, Fix supposes that Passepartout associates Detective Fix with that unaccountable money. [In truth, you recall, Passepartout believes Fix was hired by the Reform Club to make sure Fogg does not cheat during his journey.]

    — Karen P.L. Hardison
  15. To allow oneself to give into mental reflections about a prospect, pleasure, puzzle or predicament. In this case, to give into reflective thoughts and musings about the perplexing puzzle of Passepartout's allusions and jestings.

    reflections, noun: fixing the thoughts on something; careful consideration; thoughts occurring in contemplation or meditation

    — Karen P.L. Hardison
  16. verb: perplexed condition; bewildered; frustrated or confounded regarding understanding something

    — Karen P.L. Hardison
  17. heartily, adverb
    cordially, sincerely, genuinely; without restraint; exuberantly, vigorously

    — Karen P.L. Hardison
  18. Since there is good luck and bad luck in such things as his "present occupation" (i.e., following Fogg), he learns some but doesn't learn enough: for instance, he sees what Fogg's present activities are but not what his overall plan is.

    — Karen P.L. Hardison
  19. This turn of phrase means that Passepartout is asking whether Fix's current (i.e., present) round of activities (i.e., occupation) has gained him (i.e., made) much added information or much new knowledge: if he made much by his present occupation.

    — Karen P.L. Hardison
  20. verb, to chaff, present tense: to tease or jest in a good-natured way; to banter

    — Karen P.L. Hardison
  21. Passepartout is playfully alluding to what he believes is Fix's secret idea of following Fogg all the way back to England while pretending to be doing something else.

    allusion, noun: mentioning something indirectly in order to communicate an idea that is different from and larger than the one stated (e.g., going from Bombay to America to Europe alludes to following Fogg to keep record of his enterprise).

    — Karen P.L. Hardison
  22. banter, noun
    bantering, adjective
    the playful and friendly exchange of teasing remarks

    "Bantering tone" means that pleasantly teasing remarks were exchanged in a playful and friendly tone of voice: a tone of voice intended to build pleasant friendship, not a tone to bully.

    — Karen P.L. Hardison
  23. This is because Passepartout believes Fix is really a spy sent by the Reform Club to check on Fogg's honest execution of the terms of the wager.

    — Karen P.L. Hardison
  24. This is because Fix suspects Fogg to be the London bank robber.

    — Karen P.L. Hardison
  25. "Hot impatience" is an allusion to the euphemism of "land of pepper": the "hot" land of Hades (or of pepper-deck Singapore).

    — Karen P.L. Hardison
  26. This is a technique of minor flashback to keep readers focused on the originating points of the story, a wise ploy on Verne's part since he has taken through so many places and so many adventures that we need a reminder, through flashback, of where the story is grounded.

    — Karen P.L. Hardison
  27. This may be a reference to the Malaysian islands they have just left behind where pepper does in fact grow, or it could be a euphemism (nice way to say something less nice) for the land of Hades of Hell: consign them all the burn with the sting of pepper in Hades.

    — Karen P.L. Hardison
  28. These "unusual precautions" might range from slowing steam engine speed, trimming sails to catch less wind, shifting ballast, to providing passengers with life preservers and lifeboat assignments.

    — Karen P.L. Hardison
  29. This "defective construction," of course, could cast our protagonist and his loyal companions--and Detective Fix--into much peril, so adding suspense and anxiety to the progression of the story, a suspense and anxiety Passepartout feels though Fogg does not.

    — Karen P.L. Hardison
  30. Correctly spelled, "Cochinchina," this is the portion of Vietnam that lies to the north of the Annam portion. The central city of Cochinchina was called Saigon but is now called Ho Chi Min City.

    This tells us that the Rangoon is making rapid progress through the South China Sea on its way to Hong Kong.

    — Karen P.L. Hardison
  31. The name "Anam" is not in use currently, but "Annam" (the correct spelling of "Anam") is a name of French origin used for the southern-most portion of Vietnam prior to 1946 while it was a French imperial protectorate.

    The coast of Anam is therefore the southern coast of Vietnam.

    — Karen P.L. Hardison
  32. The Rangoon is a steamer, propelled by steam engine, yet is decked out in sails to take advantage of fair winds as they came up. [Fair winds are those, like their southwesterly, that push the ship in its desired direction while "foul winds"--which Fogg has not yet encountered--push a ship away from its desired destination.]

    — Karen P.L. Hardison
  33. The steamer Rangoon was traveling northeast toward Hong Kong, so the "south-west" originating wind blew from behind them, speeding them to their destination in the northeast.

    — Karen P.L. Hardison
  34. This is the last quarter phase of the moon, occurring about three weeks after the new moon, and it leads into the full moon phase. The full moon phase is when the moon exerts its greatest gravitational influence upon ocean conditions. The implication the narrator makes is that the moon's last quarter phase is precipitating rough seas for the Rangoon and its travelers (recall that in the 1800s, ships were still given the pronoun "she" akin to what other foreign languages, like French and Spanish, still do today: le bateau, el barco). [For more on the moon, see EarthSky.com.]

    — Karen P.L. Hardison
  35. To stay on his schedule pertaining to his bet with the Reform Club, Fogg needed to speed along with no disturbances to be in Hong Kong to meet and board the steamer bound for his next destination, Yokohama, japan.

    — Karen P.L. Hardison
  36. The Mountains of Malacca, where the tigers roam, that are seen from Singapore, which is at the extreme southerly tip of the large island of Malaysia, and from the deck of the Rangoon as it rounds out of the Straits of Malacca and up the east side of Malaysia on its way northerly toward Hong Kong.

    — Karen P.L. Hardison
  37. gourmand, noun
    a person who is fond, possibly indiscriminatingly, of good eating and drinking

    — Karen P.L. Hardison
  38. There are many mango varieties. The variety described here is different from the variety presently mostly available throughout America, which are variegated yellow to red coloring outside with a cantaloupe-orange colored fruit inside.

    — Karen P.L. Hardison
  39. Mango fruit is grown on very tall angular trees, having branches that tend straight upward rather than tending outward, that grow up to 130 feet (40 meters); it is called Mangifera indica L. Most mangoes are elongated fruit, though there are round apple mangoes, with a sweet but stringy fruit threaded through with tough fibers. Eating mangoes is sweetly and refreshingly rewarding, but the stringy threads make mangoes unsatisfying to some.

    — Karen P.L. Hardison
  40. They re-embarked by re-boarding the steamer bound for Hong Kong, their next destination, indeed, Aouda's hoped for final destination.

    — Karen P.L. Hardison
  41. While this description seems vague to us, we must suppose it describes houses that are built with heavy beams and roofs and that show asymmetrical designs in which parts of the house are not equally balanced by opposite parts of the house. Contrast this image to Japanese houses that are built of light weight materials and are symmetrical in design.

    — Karen P.L. Hardison
  42. adjective (also used as a preposition)
    lacking something; deficient in something

    In other words, "nor were tigers wanting" means there were plenty of tigers in the jungles: the tiger population was not lacking in numbers, nor was it deficient in the presence of robust tigers.

    — Karen P.L. Hardison
  43. The nutmeg tree, Myristica fragrans, yields the nutmeg spice from the seed of the nutmeg fruit and mace, a cinnamon-peppery like spice, from the reddish covering of the seed.

    — Karen P.L. Hardison
  44. Also called sago palm, "sago-bushes" are an evergreen shrub that are native to Japan and that have fronds similar in appearance to palm tree fronds. [These plants are poisonous to dogs and cats.] The narrator describes them as "large ferns" because the fronds of the plant are fingered and veined like ferns, though they resemble more closely the fronds of palms rather than the fronds of ferns.

    — Karen P.L. Hardison
  45. Hedges--long edging rows of plants grown at roadsides, at the edges of fields and around grazing common to act as barriers and as boundaries--were "prickly" because in England and Europe many hedges were grown of plants that had thorns, thus were prickly, such as blackthorn, hawthorn, quickthorn and whitethorn hedges.

    Hawthorn hedges have been the "universal rural hedging plant" in England since the enactment of England's Enclosure Acts requiring the hedged enclosure of grazing commons in Wales and England (there were more than 5,000 separate Enclosure Acts). Thus "prickly hedges of European fields" alludes to hawthorn hedges.

    rural hedging plant

    rural hedging plant

    rural hedging plant

    — Karen P.L. Hardison
  46. It is probable that the "pepper plant" referred to here was the black pepper spice vine that was cultivated as a hedge. The English, who had imperial control of Singapore during Fogg's journey, planted hedges along roadsides and as agricultural field boundaries. In Singapore, the pepper plant, a traveling vine, which takes root wherever a tendril touches earth, makes an ideal and fragrant substitute for the English hedge row.

    — Karen P.L. Hardison
  47. The narrator specifies the cloves form part of the "half-open flower" because, to get the clove spice, the blossom must be picked when just ripe but before blooming since the bloom includes what would otherwise have been the clove.

    — Karen P.L. Hardison
  48. The clove tree is Syzygium aromaticum and was one of the sought after spice-bearing trees of the Spice Wars between European powers struggling for Far East trade supremacy. The Chinese have used cloves for medicines and culinary spices for centuries.

    The clove spice is the inner part of the blossom, but, to get the clove, the ripe buds must be picked just before blooming. If the bud blooms, the inner hard spice becomes part of the blossom. The ripe, pink-on-green buds are picked and set out to dry; the drying process yields the clove spice.

    — Karen P.L. Hardison
  49. "New Holland" is a old horse breed name that is no longer listed as a breed but was probably the same as the Friesian horse, which originated in Friesland in the northwest of the Netherlands, thus the Anglicized "Holland" in the horse's breed name.

    Contemporary Friesian horses resemble light draft horses though their ancestors were bigger and stronger and in demand in the Middle Ages as war horses because their size and strength allowed them to wear armor and to carry a knight clad in armor. Almost extinct at one point, Friesians are gaining in numbers and popularity because of the way they combine beauty and elegant features with strength and power while maintaining nimbleness and gracefulness [Wikipedia, "Friesian Horse"].

    — Karen P.L. Hardison
  50. A "park checkered" means Singapore is a park-like island with lush trees and other vegetation that is crisscrossed in regular horizontal-vertical fashion by pleasing roads and tree lined avenues.

    A view of maps drawn in the 1800s--one by John Murray of London in 1830 and one drawn by George Dromgold Coleman in 1839--are available at these links and are provided by Mok Ly Yng of the International Map Trade Association (IMTA).

    Page 10, Murray 1830: http://www.imtamaps.org/docs/pdfs/History_of_Mapping.pdf

    Page 13, Coleman 1839: http://www.imtamaps.org/docs/pdfs/History_of_Mapping.pdf

    — Karen P.L. Hardison
  51. Something that is "not imposing in aspect" is something that does not look grand or impressive in feature, aspect, nature or quality.

    **imposing, **adjective
    grand and impressive in appearance

    aspect, noun
    feature of something; appearance to the eye or mind; nature; quality; character

    not, adverb
    used to express negation

    — Karen P.L. Hardison
  52. verb: to reveal unconsciously

    Aouda unintentionally revealed that she would enjoy a walk on shore, maybe by a sigh, maybe by a chance admiring remark, etc.

    — Karen P.L. Hardison
  53. The journal we are acquainted with in which Fogg keeps a record of his itinerary with arrivals, departures and gains or losses of hours duly noted. So far, Fogg has lost no time on his itinerary timetable.

    — Karen P.L. Hardison
  54. This means that the Rangoon was half a day ahead of schedule, giving Fogg a gain of half a day on his timetable of travel.

    — Karen P.L. Hardison
  55. This is an interesting error made by Jules Verne--or his translator--in this detail laden (having profuse detail, many details) novel. To "weigh anchor" is a nautical term that means to lift or to heave up the anchor in preparation for sailing.

    What Verne meant to say was the less glamorous sounding but accurate "dropped anchor," a nautical term that means to drop anchor at moorage in a harbor or at a dock in preparation of staying still for a time.

    — Karen P.L. Hardison
  56. verb: cut off the expected view or destination

    Those passing the islands could only see the mountains and crags without getting a view of the interior of the islands.

    — Karen P.L. Hardison
  57. Now called simply "Malay," the peninsula was formerly called Malacca.

    — Karen P.L. Hardison
  58. The narrow waterway passage between Sumatra and the Peninsula of Malay, which leads to the South China Sea, then to Hong Kong.

    — Karen P.L. Hardison
  59. Passepartout will "chaff" Fix without giving away the idea that he suspects Fix is a spy sent by the Reform Club.

    — Karen P.L. Hardison
  60. Unexplained references to things that Passepartout intends to cause distraction and confusion to the "spy."

    — Karen P.L. Hardison
  61. verb, outdated: to mock, tease or jest but in a good humored way

    — Karen P.L. Hardison
  62. Those members of the Reform Club who oppose Fogg's assertion of traveling round the world in 80 days and have bet against him.

    *adversaries, ***noun: opponents; enemies; those who attack against

    — Karen P.L. Hardison
  63. verb, transitive: to firmly decide; to firmly determine a set course

    Since "resolve" is transitive (needing to take an object), "to say" introduces an infinitive clause that fills the Object slot in the "resolve to do something" pattern (Longman Dictionary Online).

    — Karen P.L. Hardison
  64. Here, "discovery" refers to what Passepartout thinks he has discovered but which is really only mistaken conjecture based upon insufficient information.

    — Karen P.L. Hardison
  65. Passepartout is implying that the members who are spying on Fogg will regret their underhanded actions and have to give some sort of recompense for thinking so little of Fogg's honor, his worth, distinction and merit.

    — Karen P.L. Hardison
  66. adjective: characterized by high principles and noble values; having honesty, fairness, integrity

    — Karen P.L. Hardison
  67. This is unusual syntax to modern readers because current usage requires the phrasal verb "spying on": to be spying on Mr. Fogg.

    — Karen P.L. Hardison
  68. verb, outdated usage: to make certain; to make definite; to know precisely

    — Karen P.L. Hardison
  69. This inversion of negative ideas (something being far form true and something being unreasonable) means that Passepartout's idea was in fact very reasonable.

    — Karen P.L. Hardison
  70. Paraphrases: had in mind; had as his object; had as his aim, goal or end result

    — Karen P.L. Hardison
  71. phrasal verb: coming to a decision, a solution, an answer

    The phrase "hitting upon the real object" refers to Passepartout discovering, with what little information he had, the real reason Fix was fixated with Fogg (fixation gives the symbolism behind Detective Fix's name).

    — Karen P.L. Hardison
  72. rhetorical or literary device: hyperbole (exaggeration)

    Of course Passepartout cannot live for a century nor can he, therefore, cudgel his brains for a century to figure out what Fix is up to.

    — Karen P.L. Hardison
  73. figure of speech, idiom: to try hard to comprehend something, to deduce something, to recall something

    — Karen P.L. Hardison
  74. Situational irony: Passepartout is with Fogg because of Fogg's wager, now Passepartout is willing to make his own wager regarding Fix.

    — Karen P.L. Hardison
  75. Ironic turn of phrase: bought as a result of a religious sacrilege and assault, they are now religiously kept safe and preserved.

    religiously, adjective: carefully; devotedly; exactly; conscientiously

    preserved, verb: maintained in something's existing or original condition

    — Karen P.L. Hardison
  76. The beautiful slippers that he bought after having lost his shoes at the Malabar pagoda as a result of the attack of the outraged priests.

    — Karen P.L. Hardison
  77. noun: goal or purpose; end result to which feeling and action is directed

    — Karen P.L. Hardison
  78. verb, present tense form: to follow along a path; to continue or proceed along a path or route

    — Karen P.L. Hardison
  79. verb, infinitive form: to form an idea about something based upon incomplete information; to form an opinion or supposition based on partial information

    — Karen P.L. Hardison
  80. The omniscient third-person narrator is now switching from Detective Fix's point of view (Fix's thoughts, idea, emotions and motives) to Passepartout's point of view.

    — Karen P.L. Hardison
  81. Fogg's favorite, silent, card game played with two sets of partners.

    — Karen P.L. Hardison
  82. The cards dealt to a player during a rubber or round of card play is called a "hand."

    This is a **synecdoche **(the specific representing the general) in which the hand that holds the cards represents the cards dealt and played in a card game.

    — Karen P.L. Hardison
  83. verb, past tense form: restricted one's movements;* e.g., Fogg restricted his movements to his cabin, not going on deck.*

    — Karen P.L. Hardison
  84. adjective: withholding personal information; *e.g., Fix's reserved manner meant that he did not make Passepartout his confidant.

    Fix's reserved manner kept Passepartout from learning of Fix's plans.

    — Karen P.L. Hardison
  85. noun: usually a formal meeting during which ideas are discussed usually with one person examining the other for some purpose

    While Fix approached their conversation with a secret formal objective thus saw it as an "interview," it is probable that Passepartout might have described it as a friendly "conversation." This difference indicates that the narrator is still narrating from Fix's point of view.

    — Karen P.L. Hardison