Analysis Pages

Vocabulary in Black Beauty

Vocabulary Examples in Black Beauty:

Part I - 03-My Breaking In

🔒 10

"restive..."   (Part I - 03-My Breaking In)

The word "restive" means unable to stay still or silent because of some cause, such as boredom, impatience, anger, or distraction.

"girths..."   (Part I - 03-My Breaking In)

The word "girths" refer to the straps which go under a horse's stomach to hold the saddle on, also sometimes called "cinches"

"bridle..."   (Part I - 03-My Breaking In)

The word "bridle" refers to a horse's headpiece to which the bit and reigns are attached.

"bit..."   (Part I - 03-My Breaking In)

The word "bit" refers to the metal part of the bridle which is placed in the horse's mouth and allows the rider to direct, stop, or control the animal.

"headstall..."   (Part I - 03-My Breaking In)

The word "headstall" refers to the part of a bridle which is placed over a horse's head and often connected to the cheekpieces.

"halter..."   (Part I - 03-My Breaking In)

The word "halter" refers to the straps and headpiece used on a horse to help the rider lead it or tether it.

"harness..."   (Part I - 03-My Breaking In)

The word "harness" refers to the straps which connect a horse to anything he is pulling, such as a cart or a wagon.

"chaise..."   (Part I - 03-My Breaking In)

The word "chaise" refers to a horse-drawn carriage designed for two people; it usually has only two wheels but often has an open top.

"breeching..."   (Part I - 03-My Breaking In)

The word "breeching " refers to a strap which is placed on a horse's rear haunches to help stabilize his load. It also acts as a kind of brake when he is pulling a cart or wagon.

"crupper..."   (Part I - 03-My Breaking In)

The word "crupper" refers to a leather strap which is looped under a horse's tail to help hold the saddle in place.

"roan..."   (Part I - 05-A Fair Start)

The word "roan" refers to a coloring made up of some darker color (red, brown, etc.) mixed evenly with white hairs, which mutes (lightens) the color.

"show his paces..."   (Part I - 05-A Fair Start)

The phrase "to show his paces" means to display his walking, trotting, galloping, cantering (and more) skills.

"the fidgets..."   (Part I - 06-Liberty)

The word "fidgets" refers to a feeling of restlessness or nervousness, in this case because he is not always allowed to run.

"get the tickle out of your feet..."   (Part I - 06-Liberty)

The phrase "to get the tickle out of one's feet" means to let the horse run as fast and as long as he wishes because his feet (legs) are getting restless.

"breaker..."   (Part I - 07-Ginger)

A breaker is someone who trains a horse to bear a rider or pull a wagon, cart, or piece of equipment.

"high-mettled..."   (Part I - 07-Ginger)

The word "high-mettled" means full of energy and fire; having an excessive strength of spirit.

"sieve..."   (Part I - 07-Ginger)

The word "sieve" refers to any device which has holes in it and serves to separate larger particles from smaller ones; a kitchen sieve is also called a "strainer."

"persecutor..."   (Part I - 07-Ginger)

The word "persecutor" refers to one who consistently torments another in some fashion, in this case by mistreating and whipping.

"my blood was thoroughly up..."   (Part I - 07-Ginger)

The phrase "one's blood was thoroughly up" means she was angry enough not to quit easily, ready to fight until the very end.

"horseflesh..."   (Part I - 07-Ginger)

The word "horseflesh" is a term used when someone cares only about the usefulness or productiveness of the animal, ignoring his happiness and unique needs.

"pined..."   (Part I - 07-Ginger)

The word "pined" means to lose energy and spirits, or even physical strength, because of grief; to long for something unattainable.

"forelock..."   (Part I - 07-Ginger)

The word "forelock" refers to the piece of hair growing in the middle of a horse's head (and often falling between its eyes).

"weaned..."   (Part I - 07-Ginger)

The word "weaned" means to be deprived from its original food source (in this case, her mother) in an attempt to break a dependence.

"hocks..."   (Part I - 08-Ginger's Story Continued)

The word "hocks" is the equivalent of the human ankle. The hock is the joint which connects the upper and lower part of most four-footed animals' legs.

"windpipe..."   (Part I - 08-Ginger's Story Continued)

The word "windpipe" refers to the trachea, the tube located in the neck which carries air to and from the lungs.

"blow..."   (Part I - 08-Ginger's Story Continued)

The word "blow" refers to a forcible strike against something, either with a hand or with some other object.

"have a stylish turnout..."   (Part I - 08-Ginger's Story Continued)

The phrase "to have a stylish turnout" means to look impressive in front of others, in this case by torturing his horses by not letting them lower their heads.

"froth..."   (Part I - 08-Ginger's Story Continued)

The word "froth" refers to saliva which becomes bubbly, often through stress (exertion), pain, or disease; also a cooking term.

"spree..."   (Part I - 09-Merrylegs)

The word "spree" refers to a short-term but excitable adventure, often associated with alcohol and drinking.

"drovers..."   (Part I - 09-Merrylegs)

The word "drovers" refers to one who drives cattle or other animals and is responsible for keeping his herd of animals together.

"tassel..."   (Part I - 10-A Talk in the Orchard)

The word "tassel" refers to a dangling group of thread or yarn (or, in this case, horse hair) which is gathered at one end and loose at the other.

"a hard hit..."   (Part I - 11-Plain Speaking)

The phrase "a hard hit" refers to a low blow, an insult that hurts because it hits home and is therefore probably true.

"backboard..."   (Part I - 11-Plain Speaking)

The word "backboard" is a board strapped to the back which limits the person's head movements.

"parade..."   (Part I - 11-Plain Speaking)

A "parade" is just what it sounds like—a parade in which military men and their horses are on display.

"regiment..."   (Part I - 11-Plain Speaking)

The word "regiment" refers to a large number of soldiers. The specific number of soldiers in a regiment varies by country and time period.

"pet scheme..."   (Part I - 11-Plain Speaking)

The word "pet scheme" refers to a favorite idea or plan, in this case, a bad idea—abusing his horses to make sure they know who is in charge.

"come down very heavy..."   (Part I - 11-Plain Speaking)

The phrase "to come down very heavy" means to speak one's mind in a strong way against something, in this case against the mistreatment of horses.

"laden..."   (Part I - 11-Plain Speaking)

The word "laden" means weighed down or burdened. In this case, the horse carries a heavy load.

"halloo..."   (Part I - 12-A Stormy Day)

The word "halloo" is another interjection used to capture attention when it is hollered; also a typical hunting call.

"Hoy..."   (Part I - 12-A Stormy Day)

"Hoy" is a simple interjection used to get attention, similar to the modern "hey!"

"bait..."   (Part I - 12-A Stormy Day)

Baiting a horse at, say, an inn, means giving the horse food and water.

"toll-bar..."   (Part I - 12-A Stormy Day)

The word "toll-bar" refers to a gate which prevents people from crossing a bridge until the toll (fee) is paid.

"dog-cart..."   (Part I - 12-A Stormy Day)

The word "dog-cart" is a very small, low carriage drawn by a single horse, designed either for two riders who sit back-to-back or one rider and a box for his hunting dog(s).

"sham..."   (Part I - 13-The Devil's Trade Mark)

The word "sham" refers to something false that is presented as the truth; something that claims to be what it is not.

"tormentor..."   (Part I - 13-The Devil's Trade Mark)

The word "tormentor" refers to someone who tortures, in this case by pulling the wings off of flies.

"trade-mark..."   (Part I - 13-The Devil's Trade Mark)

The word "trade-mark" refers to a symbol, act, or other evidence that distinguishes it as belonging to a particular person or company.

"aggravate..."   (Part I - 13-The Devil's Trade Mark)

The verb "to aggravate" means to annoy or irritate; in this case, to get the horse upset enough to throw its rider off.

"stack-yard..."   (Part I - 13-The Devil's Trade Mark)

The word "stack-yard" refers to a kind of enclosure in which to hold sheaves of hay, straw, and other grains.

"quickset hedge..."   (Part I - 13-The Devil's Trade Mark)

A quickset hedge is a certain type of plant or tree planted in a pattern to serve as a divider or barrier, like a fence.

"thrashing..."   (Part I - 13-The Devil's Trade Mark)

The word "thrashing" refers to a harsh beating with some object, in this case, probably a whip.

"omnibuses..."   (Part I - 14-James Howard)

The word "omnibuses" refers to a long passenger vehicle, often shortened to a more familiar word—bus.

"the box..."   (Part I - 14-James Howard)

The word "the box" refers to the part of a passenger carriage on which the drivers sit and and from which they drive.

"right hand..."   (Part I - 14-James Howard)

A "right-hand man" is someone who is most trusted to do what must be done.

"beat the bush on this side..."   (Part I - 14-James Howard)

This phrase means to try to gather information by trickery, in this case by saying deliberately negative things about James in order to find out if John Manly agrees.

"a fox's tail..."   (Part I - 15-The Old Hostler)

The phrase "fox's tail" is a reference to the sometimes reckless things hunters had their horses (and therefore themselves) do when hunting for fox; fox tails were collected rather like sporting trophies.

"squares about at you..."   (Part I - 15-The Old Hostler)

This phrase means to meets someone face to face, digging in his heels, as if in confrontation.

"hostlers..."   (Part I - 15-The Old Hostler)

The word "hostler" refers to workers, sometimes younger boys, who take care of horses for the guests at an inn.

"tiles..."   (Part I - 16-The Fire)

The word "tiles" refers to the building materials used to cover walls. They are thin and often made of plastic, clay, or concrete.

"tap..."   (Part I - 16-The Fire)

The word "tap" is short for taproom, which is a bar or pub, often located inside of an inn.

"leading rein..."   (Part I - 17-John Manly's Talk)

The word "leading rein" refers to the long straps or reins connected to the bit and held by someone, usually on the ground, to lead the horse for training purposes.

"hoeing..."   (Part I - 17-John Manly's Talk)

The verb "to hoe" means to dig up or use a hoe to get rid of weeds around the growing vegetable plant.

"workhouse..."   (Part I - 17-John Manly's Talk)

Also known as a "spike," an English workhouse was a place where people who could not support themselves had to live and work until they were able to either get out of debt or survive on their own again. It was a hard place to live, so only those who had no choice would go there.

"inflammation..."   (Part I - 18-Going for the Doctor)

The word "inflammation" means swelling. When the body is under attack in some way, it often uses inflammation to try to heal itself.

"gruel..."   (Part I - 18-Going for the Doctor)

The word "gruel" refers to a thin porridge made of a grain (such as oat or rice) boiled in either milk or water.

"cuttings..."   (Part I - 19-Only Ignorance)

The word "cuttings" refers to the pieces cut from a larger plant in order to grow another plant.

"hothouse..."   (Part I - 19-Only Ignorance)

The word "hothouse" refers to a special, temperature-controlled place for growing plants; also known as a greenhouse.

"magistrate..."   (Part I - 20-Joe Green)

The word "magistrate" refers to an officer of the state, generally one who had the right to settle disputes; a judge.

"carter..."   (Part I - 20-Joe Green)

The word "carter" refers to one who leads the horse which carries heavy loads, in this case bricks.

"luggage cart..."   (Part I - 20-Joe Green)

The word "luggage cart" refers to a utility cart used to haul luggage and other goods rather than people.

"footmen..."   (Part II - 22-Earlshall)

The word "footmen" refers to servants, often young boys, used to run errands or do other odd jobs on an estate.

"constitution..."   (Part II - 22-Earlshall)

The word "constitution" refers to composition or disposition, in this case he says she is naturally a little more irritable than the black horse.

"stood up better for..."   (Part II - 23-A Strike for Liberty)

This phrase means stood up more for, in this case for the rights and care of the horses.

"carriage pole..."   (Part II - 23-A Strike for Liberty)

The word "carriage pole" refers to the long pole connecting a cart or carriage to the horse or horses which are pulling it.

"terret..."   (Part II - 23-A Strike for Liberty)

The word "terret" refers to one of several rings on the top of a harness through which reins or lines are passed through.

"dike..."   (Part II - 24-The Lady Anne, or a Runaway Horse)

The word "dike" refers to a long wall used to help prevent flooding. It is a big pile of dirt on one side and a ditch on the other.

"heath..."   (Part II - 24-The Lady Anne, or a Runaway Horse)

The word "heath" refers to an open field, fairly empty of anything but occasional shrubs or bushes.

"given me my head..."   (Part II - 24-The Lady Anne, or a Runaway Horse)

This phrase means to allow the horse to control the path they ride and how fast they move.

"mole-turns..."   (Part II - 24-The Lady Anne, or a Runaway Horse)

The word "mole-turns" probably refers to the underground tunnels created (and lived in) by moles; each tunnel has a hole at either end, of course, making the tunneled ground dangerous for a galloping horse.

"common..."   (Part II - 24-The Lady Anne, or a Runaway Horse)

The word "common" means open area, something like a park, used by the entire community.

"giving me a free rein..."   (Part II - 24-The Lady Anne, or a Runaway Horse)

"To give free reign" means to allow the horse to run as it wishes, without any guidance or encouragement from the rider.

"bolted..."   (Part II - 24-The Lady Anne, or a Runaway Horse)

The word "bolted" means darted or dashed quickly, with little concern for anything around.

"side-saddle..."   (Part II - 24-The Lady Anne, or a Runaway Horse)

The word "side-saddle" refers to a saddle which allows a woman to sit sideways on a horse (with both legs on one side of the animal) rather than astride (with one leg on each side of the animal), usually used in equestrian events (horse riding competitions).

"thoroughbred..."   (Part II - 24-The Lady Anne, or a Runaway Horse)

The word "thoroughbred" refers to a specific breed of horse used in racing, though the term is generally used to refer to any purebred horse.

"bay..."   (Part II - 24-The Lady Anne, or a Runaway Horse)

The word "bay' refers to the most common horse color; having a reddish-brown coat with black mane, tail, ears, and feet.

"invalid..."   (Part II - 24-The Lady Anne, or a Runaway Horse)

The word "invalid" refers to someone who is sick or weak due to illness or injury, often unable to move or walk around much, if at all.

"quick..."   (Part II - 25-Reuben Smith)

The "quick" refers to the sensitive spot at the edge of a horse's hoof, similar to the sensitive spot on a human finger where the fingernail is connected to the finger.

"light brougham..."   (Part II - 25-Reuben Smith)

The word "brougham" refers to a small, enclosed carriage pulled by a single horse; the driver sits outside the cabin on a bench.

"bout..."   (Part II - 25-Reuben Smith)

The word "bout" refers to a short but intense period of some activity, in this case drinking.

"an under situation..."   (Part II - 25-Reuben Smith)

The phrase "under situation" refers to a job working for someone rather than being the boss or supervisor.

"tandem..."   (Part II - 25-Reuben Smith)

The word "tandem" refers to a carriage pulled by two horses, one in front of the other rather than side by side.

"four-in-hand..."   (Part II - 25-Reuben Smith)

The word "four-in-hand" refers to a carriage pulled by four horses which is driven by one person.

"a blistering fluid..."   (Part II - 26-How it Ended)

The phrase "blistering fluid" refers to a substance to "blister" off the horse's hair so that the wound will heal faster (the body supposedly spends its nutrients healing the wound rather than maintaining healthy hair).

"poultice..."   (Part II - 26-How it Ended)

The word "poultice" refers to a warm, soft cloth or other material pressed against a wound or injury to reduce swelling and pain.

"steeplechase..."   (Part II - 27-Ruined and Going Downhill)

The word "steeplechase" refers to a horse race which includes obstacles such as fences and water to jump over or across.

"contemptuously..."   (Part II - 28-A Job Horse and His Drivers)

The adverb "contemptuously" means scornfully, as if he does not think the man is very smart.

"playing the old soldier..."   (Part II - 28-A Job Horse and His Drivers)

The idiom "playing the old soldier" refers to the knowledge and experience with which an experienced soldier figures out a way to make his life easier, in this case by pretending to be lame.

"phaeton..."   (Part II - 28-A Job Horse and His Drivers)

The word "phaeton" refers to an open carriage with large wheels, drawn by one or two horses.

"shies..."   (Part II - 28-A Job Horse and His Drivers)

The verb "shies" means jumps or starts suddenly, as when it is startled, nervous, or scared.

"cockneys..."   (Part II - 29-Cockneys)

Specifically, a cockney is anyone born within the sound of the church bells of St. Mary-le-Bow, located at the east end of London. In general, the term refers to working-class Londoners. In this case, those who are not used to horses and riding because they are not aristocratic gentlemen.

"blustered..."   (Part II - 30-A Thief)

The word "to bluster" means to talk loudly and with great passion but little content, in this  case in an effort to divert attention from the truth.

"vetches..."   (Part II - 30-A Thief)

The word "vetches" refers to a plant with small flowers, used as feed for some farm animals.

"liniment..."   (Part II - 31-A Humbug)

The word "liniment" refers to a soothing medicinal ointment applied directly onto the affected area.

"thrush..."   (Part II - 31-A Humbug)

The word "thrush" refers to a bacterial infection in a horse's hoof, in this case due to the damp straw he was forced to stand in.

"horse balls..."   (Part II - 31-A Humbug)

Here, the word "horse balls" refers powdered medicine mixed with water and molasses or liquid medicine mixed with bran, formed in a ball and put down a horse's throat.

"send back a smell..."   (Part II - 31-A Humbug)

When something "sends back a smell," it means that drains get clogged enough that whatever goes in them does not drain completely, and some of those things smell.

"smart..."   (Part II - 31-A Humbug)

Here, the word "smart" means to sting and water with tears (as often happens when cutting onions, for example).

"touching his hat..."   (Part II - 31-A Humbug)

Tipping or touching one's hat or cap is a gesture of respect, friendship, greeting, or recognition.

"crupper..."   (Part II - 31-A Humbug)

The word "crupper" refers to a device used on horses which loops around the tail and connects to the back of a saddle, in order to hold the saddle in place.

"cab stand..."   (Part III - 32-A Horse Fair)

A cab stand is a place where horse-drawn cabs and their owners waited for someone to hire them.

"knuckling over..."   (Part III - 32-A Horse Fair)

The phrase "knuckling over" refers to a condition which causes a horse to trip or stumble because the toe "catches" on the ground as he walks.

"unsoundness of wind..."   (Part III - 32-A Horse Fair)

This phrase means unable to breathe properly; getting an insufficient intake of air.

"character..."   (Part III - 33-A London Cab Horse)

Here, the word "character" refers to the qualities, intellectual and moral, which make a person (or a horse) who he is.

"palisades..."   (Part III - 33-A London Cab Horse)

The word "palisades" refers to a fence or wall built of wood posts or, in this case, iron poles.

"ring snaffle..."   (Part III - 33-A London Cab Horse)

The word "ring snaffle" refers to a bit which is placed in a horse's mouth, it has a metal loop on either side of the head to which reins are attached and which are then used by the driver to comfortably and easily guide the horse.

"took as much pains..."   (Part III - 33-A London Cab Horse)

The phrase "took as much pains" means tried to make sure everything was just right and not painful.

"regular brick..."   (Part III - 33-A London Cab Horse)

A "regular brick" is British slang meaning "a reliable man" or "a dependable man"—or in this case, a reliable or dependable horse.

"beaten off..."   (Part III - 34-An Old War Horse)

The phrase "beaten off" means to hit with the flat of the sword to get out of the battle (the soldiers were trying to protect the horses as well as get them out of the way).

"slaughter..."   (Part III - 34-An Old War Horse)

The word "slaughter" means to kill animals, usually for food; in this case, during the course of battle.

"crest..."   (Part III - 34-An Old War Horse)

The word "crest" refers to a tuft (lock) of hair, in this case the hair between a horse's ears.

"champing of our bits..."   (Part III - 34-An Old War Horse)

The phrase "champing of our bits" means biting down on their mouth pieces (bits) in their eagerness to do something, in this case go to battle.

"caparisoned..."   (Part III - 34-An Old War Horse)

The word "caparisoned" means that the horses, too, were wearing all their finest and most ornamental military gear.

"saber..."   (Part III - 34-An Old War Horse)

The word "saber" refers to a curved sword with a protective guard over the sword-bearer's knuckles.

"lances..."   (Part III - 34-An Old War Horse)

The word "lance" is a long pole with a spear attached, used mostly by soldiers who were fighting on horseback.

"rolled about..."   (Part III - 34-An Old War Horse)

A ship "rolls" as it sails through the ups and downs of active sea waves caused by high winds and/or storms.

"whipcord..."   (Part III - 35-Jerry Barker)

The word "whipcord" refers to the material used to make whips (implying here that Larry whips his horses too often or too much).

"pocketed..."   (Part III - 35-Jerry Barker)

The word "pocketed" means earned, in this case from the man who was in such a hurry to get to the station—his last passenger.

"porter..."   (Part III - 35-Jerry Barker)

The word "porter" refers to one whose job it is to help travelers with their bags and suitcases.

"chirrup..."   (Part III - 35-Jerry Barker)

The word "chirrup" means a short little sound, in this case the signal the driver uses to signal his horse to begin moving.

"put on the steam..."   (Part III - 35-Jerry Barker)

The phrase "to put on the steam" means to go faster (the steam reference is to steam engines, powered mostly by coal or wood). In this case, it means to make the horse go faster.

"tavern..."   (Part III - 35-Jerry Barker)

The word "tavern" refers to an inn or pub, serving both food and drinks; often it would also have lodging available for travelers.

"lay it down at another man's door..."   (Part III - The Sunday Cab)

The phrase "to lay it down at another man's door" means to blame something on someone else when it is, in fact, your responsibility.

"heart alive..."   (Part III - The Sunday Cab)

The phrase "heart alive!" is an expression to add emphasis, something like the more modern "as I'm living!"

"alter..."   (Part III - The Sunday Cab)

The word "alter" means to change, in this case from a license to run his cabs six days a week to a license to run all seven days of the week.

"meat pie..."   (Part III - 37-The Golden Rule)

The word "meat pie" refers to a pie similar to a traditional pie, but made only of meat; a savory rather than a sweet pie.

"look to..."   (Part III - 39-Seedy Sam)

The phrase "to look to" means to take care of, in this case, care for and about the horses' health and welfare.

"sidled..."   (Part III - 40-Poor Ginger)

The verb "to sidle" means to walk carefully and rather secretively, hoping no one notices.

"lank..."   (Part III - 40-Poor Ginger)

The word "lank" means straight and limp, in this case indicating poor health and ill treatment.

"mind..."   (Part III - 41-The Butcher)

Literally "mind me" or "pay attention to what I said and follow my directions."

"ragamuffin..."   (Part III - 42-The Election)

The word "ragamuffin" refers to a child who is dressed in raggedy clothes, implying the child is poor.

"pinafore..."   (Part III - 42-The Election)

The word "pinafore" refers to an apron which covers both the top and the bottom of the wearer.

"great bills..."   (Part III - 42-The Election)

"Great bills" refers to large signs, in this case with their version of election bumper stickers.

"mistress..."   (Part III - 43-A Friend in Need)

A mistress is someone for whom one works, in this case Polly's former employer.

"by-streets..."   (Part III - 43-A Friend in Need)

By-streets are the street which are not as busy as the main roads or streets (we call them "side streets").

"summons..."   (Part III - 43-A Friend in Need)

The word "summons" refers to a request to appear in court; in this case the men are talking about suing him.

"dodge..."   (Part III - 43-A Friend in Need)

The word "dodge" refers to a trick, in this case letting the men think he was going to take them where they wanted to go, though he had no intention of taking them anywhere.

"nose-bag..."   (Part III - 43-A Friend in Need)

The word "nose-bag" refers to a feed bag placed over the head of a horse so he can eat without having to have a box for his food.

"a free head..."   (Part III - 44-Old Captain and His Successor)

This phrase means able to be controlled without harsh measures; allowed some freedom.

"an ill wind that blew nobody good..."   (Part III - 44-Old Captain and His Successor)

One person's misfortune can result in another's joy or happiness.

"chains..."   (Part III - 44-Old Captain and His Successor)

Figuratively, chains are anything that keep a person enslaved or from being free; in this case, the chains of alcohol addiction or control.

"slave..."   (Part III - 44-Old Captain and His Successor)

Here, the word "slave" refers to anyone who is addicted to a substance, such as alcohol.

"treading pretty hard on my toes..."   (Part III - 44-Old Captain and His Successor)

The phrase "to treat on one's toes" means to offend someone with words. In this case, Jerry is commenting about how evil alcohol and drinking alcohol are to someone who admittedly likes to drink alcohol (a more modern version is "stepping on someone's toes").

"dray..."   (Part III - 44-Old Captain and His Successor)

A "dray" is a cart used to carry kegs or casks, like beer barrels, usually sideless.

"charge..."   (Part III - 45-Jerry's New Year)

The word "charge" refers to the fee they had to pay Jerry, the cab driver, for the ride and his time.

"squalls..."   (Part III - 45-Jerry's New Year)

The word "squall" refers to a sudden bursts of wind, usually connected with a storm or other weather incident.

"threshold..."   (Part IV - 46-Jakes and the Lady)

The word "threshold" refers to the entryway or entrance to something, in this case the opening of the stall.

"killed out of hand..."   (Part IV - 47-Hard Times)

The phrase "killed out of hand" means quickly killed so one is not bothered or put out; gotten rid of immediately.

"fetch..."   (Part IV - 47-Hard Times)

The word "fetch" means to bring, in this case how much money he will get for the horse.

"cordial..."   (Part IV - 47-Hard Times)

The word "cordial" refers to a tonic, which is a kind of medicine or liqueur designed to revive his spirit and body, at least temporarily.

"hold your tongue..."   (Part IV - 47-Hard Times)

The phrase "to hold one's tongue" means to be quiet; stay silent; in this case, quit talking about the condition of the horse.

"niter..."   (Part IV - 47-Hard Times)

The word "niter" refers to a colorless mineral used, among other things, to make gunpowder.

"genteel..."   (Part IV - 48-Farmer Thoroughgood and His Grandson Willie)

The word "genteel" mans elegant and well bred; in this case, people who are not going to mistreat the horse.

"benefactor..."   (Part IV - 48-Farmer Thoroughgood and His Grandson Willie)

The word "benefactor" refers to someone who gives help or aid, especially in the form of money; in this case, the kind man bought the horse and will take good care of the animal.

"purse..."   (Part IV - 48-Farmer Thoroughgood and His Grandson Willie)

The word "purse" refers to the small pouch or bag in which men kept their money, which was often in the form of coins.

"trial..."   (Part IV - 49-My Last Home)

The word "trial" refers to a trial period, in this case to see if this horse is a good fit for them.

Analysis Pages