Facts in The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde

Facts Examples in The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde:

Chapter Two 1

"Henry Jekyll, M.D., D.C.L., LL.D., F.R.S., etc...."   (Chapter Two)

Henry Jekyll is a man decorated with numerous academic degrees. In succession, his titles stand for doctor of medicine, doctor of civil law, legum doctor, and fellow of the Royal Society— a prestigious organization of English scientists. This list bespeaks both Dr. Jekyll’s scientific brilliance and his high status and esteem in society. These characteristics are important as the mystery of Jekyll’s relationship with Mr. Hyde unfolds.

"penny numbers and twopenny salads..."   (Chapter Four)

Penny numbers were a type of cheap periodical publication costing one penny (one pence). Twopenny salads, which cost two pence, are also quite cheap and fairly low quality, consisting of inferior vegetables; that these items are sold in Hyde’s neighborhood indicates that he does not live in the best part of town.

"the strong smell of kernels that hung upon the air,..."   (Chapter Eight)

The “strong smell of kernels” can be attributed to the fruit or nut kernels from which Mr. Hyde had extracted cyanide, a poisonous chemical often used for suicide.

"And now, you who have so long been bound to the most narrow and material views..."   (Chapter Nine)

Mr. Hyde accuses Dr. Lanyon of being a materialist in his scientific pursuits. “Material views” include all philosophies which reduce reality down to physical existence. Mr. Hyde offers, in contrast, “the virtue of transcendental medicine,” which is not an actual field per se. Hyde, however, seems to be espousing a science that incorporates a spiritual or divine dimension.

"bull’s eye..."   (Chapter Nine)

Though its other definition is more well-known, the policeman’s bull’s eye referenced here is in fact a lantern. Invented in the 13th century, its popularity persisted into the 18th century as a precursor to the modern flashlight. The lantern’s user would switch open the device’s door, which would allow the light to focus on a specific direction.