Analysis Pages

Historical Context in Madame Bovary

Historical Context Examples in Madame Bovary:

Part I - Chapter Six

🔒 4

"Clemence Isaure..."   (Part I - Chapter Six)

Clemence Isaure is a legendary character supposed to be a patroness of the arts.

Subscribe to unlock »

"Agnes Sorel..."   (Part I - Chapter Six)

Agnes Sorel was a 15th century courtesan and favorite of King Charles VII of France.

Subscribe to unlock »

"the Revolution..."   (Part I - Chapter Six)

The French Revolution of 1789 where Louis XVI and Marie Antoinette were executed by guillotine, ending the monarchy altogether. Marie Antoinette is dubbed "The Last Queen of France."

Subscribe to unlock »

"Mademoiselle de la Valliere..."   (Part I - Chapter Six)

Mademoiselle de la Valliere was a lover of King Louis XIV who caused an incredible controversy in the court of the "Sun King" of France, and who eventually retired to a convent. Alexandre Dumas idealized her life and wrote about her.

Subscribe to unlock »

"Count d'Artois..."   (Part I - Chapter Eight)

Count d'Artois was the future Charles X of France, brother of the deposed and beheaded King Louis XVI, and brother-in-law to Marie Antoinette.

Subscribe to unlock »

"principles of '89..."   (Part II - Chapter One)

The Principles of 1789 by Emmanuel Joseph Sieyes consist of the tenets imposed upon the people of France after the fall of the constitutional monarchy. It expresses the power of the Third Estate, the people's movement, which chides away from the monarchy.

Subscribe to unlock »

"Beranger..."   (Part II - Chapter One)

Pierre-Jean de Beranger (1780-1857) was a poet, songwriter, satirist, and critic of the Napoleonic France era.

Subscribe to unlock »

"Voltaire..."   (Part II - Chapter One)

Francois Marie Arouet (1964- 1778) was a philosopher, dramatist, and author of the Enlightenment period under the pen name Voltaire. He was a critic of the French government whose wits got him voted into the Academie Francaise.

Subscribe to unlock »

"Franklin..."   (Part II - Chapter One)

Benjamin Franklin (1706-1790) was an American inventor, ambassador, philosopher, political envoy, founding father of the United States of America, intellectual, community leader, and writer (among many other things).

Subscribe to unlock »

"Gallic cock..."   (Part II - Chapter One)

The Gallic Rooster is the unofficial national symbol of France. It is a Christian symbol that stands for "vigilance" much like roosters watch over the other chickens in a farm. However, the French also adopted it because of the way a citizen of Gaul is called gallicus and the rooster is a gallus. During the Second French Republic roosters were used on coins and other nationally-recognized objects.

Subscribe to unlock »

"Charles X..."   (Part II - Chapter One)

Charles X was the younger brother of Louis XVI and the brother-in-law of Marie Antoinette who would later became the King of France. Also known as Charles Phillipe.

Subscribe to unlock »

"Walter Scott..."   (Part II - Chapter Two)

Sir Walter Scott (1771- 1832) was a novelist, historian, and considered the father of the historical novel.

Subscribe to unlock »

"scrofula..."   (Part II - Chapter Two)

Known in the middle ages as "The King's Evil," "scrofula" is the swelling of lymph nodes in the neck as a result of the same bacteria that causes tuberculosis. It was thought that French and English kings had a god-given power to heal scrofula and that they could touch people and cure them. 

Subscribe to unlock »

"19th Ventose, year xi., article I..."   (Part II - Chapter Three)

During the Ancien Régime, the medical profession was reformed by Fourcroy. The calendar was changed drastically in France and gave months, seasons, and years different names. As expected, it ended in disaster, which is why that calendar is not used today. 10 March 1803 would have been 19 Ventose (an=year) XI. The law remains though, that only medical doctors, trained physician's assistants, or nurses can practice medicine.

Subscribe to unlock »

Analysis Pages