Rhyme in The Rime of the Ancient Mariner

The Rime of the Ancient Mariner in Seven Parts 2
"The guests are met, the feast is set..."   (The Rime of the Ancient Mariner in Seven Parts)

Coleridge utilizes many different literary devices throughout the poem, such as this line where he uses internal rhyme. Coleridge employs this device, among others, to heighten the poem's effects by adding to the meanings of words and enhancing the cadence of the poem.

"And southward aye we fled...."   (The Rime of the Ancient Mariner in Seven Parts)

So far, this poem has consisted of four-line stanzas, called quatrains, with a rhyme structure of ABCB. Coleridge deliberately breaks this style in this stanza and in several other places later on to demonstrate that he values content and meaning more than form and structure. This is significant because this poem and the larger collection it was published in, Lyrical Ballads, marked a significant transition in writing style away from classical poetic elements to the more modern, Romantic period in British literature.