Themes in The Rime of the Ancient Mariner

The Rime of the Ancient Mariner in Seven Parts 4
"He prayeth best, who loveth best..."   (The Rime of the Ancient Mariner in Seven Parts)

Coleridge's moral of the story relates to having a relationship with God. To have a right relationship with God, this stanza suggests that it is necessary to realize that God made and loves everything in the world, not just humans.

"The Mariner hath his will..."   (The Rime of the Ancient Mariner in Seven Parts)

Coleridge indicates something supernatural early in this poem by presenting the readers with an ancient and skinny Mariner who appears to be able to compel the Wedding-Guest to listen to him with nothing more than his stare. That the Mariner has supernatural qualities foreshadows the likewise otherworldly elements of his story, signaling that they will be a strong thematic element throughout.

"Glimmered the white Moon-shine..."   (The Rime of the Ancient Mariner in Seven Parts)

How does Coleridge first introduce an aspect of the supernatural in the poem?

"Nor shapes of men nor beasts we ken—..."   (The Rime of the Ancient Mariner in Seven Parts)

The Mariner describes the complete isolation of the ship in the Antarctic, and how the sailors don’t recognize anything in the area. This section, and others like it later in the poem, describes and celebrates the majesty and power of nature, a defining characteristic of Romanticism and one of the themes Coleridge explores throughout this poem.