Analysis Pages

Vocabulary in Cyrano de Bergerac

Vocabulary Examples in Cyrano de Bergerac:

Act I - Scene II

🔒 5

"Messieurs..."   (Act I - Scene II)

The French word "messieurs" is the plural form of "monsieur," which means "mister" or "sir."

"candelabra..."   (Act I - Scene II)

The word "candelabra" refers to a candle holder or chandelier that holds several candles at once.

"Tomorrow I join the Guards, in the Cadets..."   (Act I - Scene II)

During the 17th century, a French cadet was a soldier who hoped to gain experience in order to become an officer. Between 1618 and 1648, France was involved in the Thirty Years War in which Frances and its allies fought against the Holy Roman Empire.

"ode..."   (Act I - Scene II)

The word "ode" refers to a type of lyric poem that glorifies one idea, object, or person.

"triolet..."   (Act I - Scene II)

The word "triolet" refers to a poem which contains eight lines per stanza. The rhyme scheme follows the abaaabab pattern where the first line repeats in the fourth and seventh lines, and the second in the eighth.

"barbarian..."   (Act I - Scene IV)

The word "barbarian" refers to an uncivilized person. Here, it is one who does not conform to the accepted norms of fashion in society.

"Aristophanes’ hippocampelephantocamelos..."   (Act I - Scene IV)

Aristophanes was a Greek comic and satirical playwright during the fourth century BCE. Attributed to Aristophanes, the word "hippocampelephantocamelos" refers to an imaginary beast which combines the characteristics of seahorses, elephants, and camels.

"Sic transit..."   (Act I - Scene IV)

The Latin phrase sic transit is short for sic transit gloria mundi, meaning “thus passes the glory of the world.” Using this Latin phrase, Bellerose mocks Montfleury.

"farce..."   (Act I - Scene IV)

The word "farce" refers to a comedic play that follows an improbable plot and employs lewd humor and slapstick.

"game..."   (Act II - The Poet's Eating-House)

Here, the word "game" refers to any wild animals that are hunted either for sport or food.

"couplet..."   (Act II - Scene I)

The word "couplet" refers to two lines of rhythmic and rhyming poetry.

"silhouettes..."   (Act II - Scene III)

The word "silhouette" refers to a darkened shape or outline of something, particularly the outline of a person's face when looked at from the side.

"laughing-stock..."   (Act II - Scene IV)

The word "laughing-stock" refers to someone who is seen as being extremely foolish or ridiculous.

"woos..."   (Act II - Scene IV)

The verb "to woo" means to try to win someone over. This word is often used in a romantic sense but it is also applicable in other contexts.

"regiment..."   (Act II - Scene VI)

The word "regiment" refers to several battalions or a very large group of soldiers.

"pentacrostic..."   (Act II - Scene VII)

The word "pentacrostic" refers to a set of five lines of poetry in which a name or word occurs five times throughout.

"pleat..."   (Act II - Scene VIII)

The word "pleat" refers to an intentional and purposeful fold in fabric, curtains, or other materials.

"madrigals..."   (Act II - Scene VIII)

The word "madrigals" refers to vocal arrangements where three voices since in harmony.

"square..."   (Act III - Roxane's Kiss)

Here, the word "square" refers to an open public space usually in the center of a town, used for gatherings in the community.

"demi-semi-quaver..."   (Act III - Scene I)

The word "demi-semi-quaver," which means one thirty-second of a whole note, is a musical term for a note and its duration.

"laymen..."   (Act III - Scene II)

Here, the word "laymen" refers to someone who is not an official representative of the church but who is part of the religion or church.

"syndic..."   (Act III - Scene II)

The word "syndic" refers to an officer of an organization who is charged to carry out certain duties.

"besiegers..."   (Act IV - Scene I)

The word "besiegers" refers to soldiers who surround and crowd around an area in order to capture it from an enemy.

"reveille..."   (Act IV - Scene II)

The word "reveille," which means "wake up" in French, is the sound played on the bugle or drum to awaken soldiers at sunrise.

"hearthstones..."   (Act IV - Scene III)

The word "hearthstones" refers to the stones that make up the area in front of a fireplace. Symbolically speaking, hearths or hearthstones represent home.

"minuet..."   (Act IV - Scene III)

The word "minuet" refers to a type of 17th century dance that originated in France.

"harbor..."   (Act IV - Scene IV)

The verb "to harbor" means to hold something inside for a long time, such as resentment, bitterness, or other strong emotion.

"gallant..."   (Act IV - Scene V)

The word "gallant" refers to someone who demonstrates bravery and heroism.

"lance..."   (Act IV - Scene VI)

The word "lance" refers to a spear generally tipped with steel or other metal and used in battle by knights or soldiers.

"blockaded..."   (Act IV - Scene VII)

The word "blockaded" means to be shut off from the outside world, especially during war. In a blockade, no supplies or people can enter.

"intoxicating..."   (Act IV - Scene VII)

The word "intoxicating" means exhilarated or excited—a sense generally caused by excessive drinking and loss of control.

"recoil..."   (Act IV - Scene VII)

The word "recoil" refers to the jerk that a gun or cannon makes upon firing.

"habits..."   (Act V - Scene I)

The word "habits" refers to the distinctive attire worn by members of religious orders or by members of a congregation.

"Lute..."   (Act V - Scene II)

The word "lute" refers to a pear-shaped stringed instrument similar to a guitar.

"colonnade..."   (Act V - Scene III)

The word "colonnade" refers to a series of columns lined up in a row which support a roof or other structure.

"lackey..."   (Act V - Scene III)

The word "lackey" refers to a servant who performs menial tasks for the wealthy.

"Court Gazette..."   (Act V - Scene V)

The phrase "Court Gazette" refers to someone who can share gossip and news from the royal French court.

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