Foreshadowing in The Cask of Amontillado

Poe’s use of foreshadowing creates an unsettling atmosphere within the story. Because Montresor tells the audience that he seeks revenge against Fortunato at the beginning of the story, much of what Montresor says both foreshadows and reminds the audience of Fortunato’s impending gruesome end.

The Cask of Amontillado 3
"Nemo me impune lacessit.”..."   (The Cask of Amontillado)

This Latin phrase translated to, “No one attacks me with impunity.” This all-too-appropriate motto, along with the lurid coat of arms, are most likely totally fictitious. Montresor may be inventing them for the pleasure of hinting at what he intends to do to Fortunato. Fortunado's response suggests that he doesn't understand Latin and is only pretending to understand the motto.

"You? Impossible! A mason?..."   (The Cask of Amontillado)

Fortunato cannot believe that Montresor would be accepted as a Mason because of his social standing, making his accusation another one of Montresor’s “thousand injuries.” Montresor’s reply reveals more of Poe’s dark humor, as the pun foreshadows Montresor’s plan for revenge against Fortunato.

"fourth side the bones had been thrown down, and lay promiscuously..."   (The Cask of Amontillado)

Review: What is this a hint or clue about; what does it hint that Montresor has done?