Foreshadowing in Beowulf

Foreshadowing Examples in Beowulf:

III 1

"hence it after became           Certainly known to the children of men..."   (III)

For the purposes of the story, it is important that Grendel's reign of terror lasts as long as it does. By stating that the dire situation became well-known among the Danes, Swedes, and Geats, the poet foreshadows the coming of a hero to save Hrothgar's Hall.

"To Sigmund accrued then..."   (XIV)

The digression here to the story of Sigemund serves several purposes. First, by linking Beowulf to the cultural hero Sigemond, Beowulf is praised and his reputation is greatly enhanced. Second, the inclusion of this tale is meant to foreshadow more conflict in Beowulf's life.

"as to Sigmund's           Mighty achievements..."   (XIV)

The poet links Beowulf with the the legendary hero Sigemund, from a series of tales from the Old Norse Volsunga Saga that an Anglo-Saxon audience would know. The effect is to build on an existing narrative and perhaps foreshadow coming events in Beowulf's own story.